Water plays a key role in the ability for any region to thrive; and to do so in good health and well-being. For the residents of the greater Antelope Valley, water has the ability to link together the communities that all have a common need. Each of us relies on this most important resource for drinking, for bathing, for household activities, and for outdoors.

Read our 2016 water update here...

Discipline is the bridge between goals and accomplishment.
Jim Rohn

The residents of the greater Antelope Valley know what having water discipline feels like. Our water assets and infrastructure are in great condition as a result. Success in this endeavor is in large part due to the cooperative spirit from our regional water providers to find reasonable solutions that work.

WATER
SEEING THE RELIABILITY, RESILIENCE & DIVERSITY OF THE GREATER ANTELOPE VALLEY

As the High Desert region of the Southern California began to gain
popularity in the 1930’s for its out-of-the-way small town feel from
Hollywood, water became a focal point for prosperity and family
livelihood. With the help of a burgeoning aerospace industry, our
valley saw a rapid need to develop residential neighborhoods and
local businesses to support the families settling throughout the region.
The small community water purveyors within the “Aerospace Valley”
quickly began to feel the need to provide more water at a faster rate to
their residents.

Water has always been a scarce resource due to the arid environment
of Southern California. The majority of the state’s precipitation
falls on the slopes of the northern mountain ranges, yet most of the
population and irrigated farmlands are located in the drier, southern
half, of the state. The communities here rely on the winter snowpack
and rain to refill California’s streams, rivers, and lakes. Then, the
California Aqueduct is used to move billions of gallons of water to the
south to ensure that our valley’s residents and businesses have enough
water to thrive.

Our state is currently experiencing one of the worst droughts in
recent history, yet the 2016 water year is off to a good start. While
Californians’ attention is driven to the extreme conditions of flood
and drought, given strong El Niño conditions in the Pacific Ocean, the
water suppliers of the greater Antelope Valley are building further on a
diversified water portfolio. A significant part of this portfolio is water
supply from local groundwater wells.

Following 16 years of litigation in the courts, local cities, governing
counties, the valley’s farmers and land owners, along with the region’s
water agencies became a part of the solution to local groundwater
pumping. The final settlement approved by the court will help to
clarify the right to pump water from local wells. All of the valley’s
groundwater is within a “closed basin”. The water that either falls here
or runs off from the various mountain ranges, is absorbed into the
ground or evaporates. Managing this vital resource by creating a level
playing field, where all parties have an allocated amount of water to
pump and use, is a step that will ensure long-term water reliability.

The ever-renewing sense of responsibility to community and to the
delivery of high-quality drinking water is an important aspect in
making the greater Antelope Valley prosper. Growing is important, but
managing our resources within a balance of residential, commercial,
and municipal need is imperative. This balance is found in the
reliability, resilience, and diversity of the greater Antelope Valley.

Read our 2015 water update here...

DOING MORE>with LESS: 

WE ARE OPEN FOR BUSINESS
SECURING A SUSTAINABLE, RELIABLE, AND DIVERSIFIED SUPPLY OF WATER FOR THE GREATER ANTELOPE VALLEY

Water 2015 iamge

This unique region of Southern California, with its micro-climates,
deserts, mountains, valleys, and coastlines, make it a prime destination for living, working, and
raising a family. As to the residents of this unique area, we can boast in our creativity,
forward-thinking, and adaptability. These are the qualities that support California’s industry,
education, and communities.

The Greater Antelope Valley high desert region is located Northeast of Los Angeles, just over the
San Gabriel mountain range. Here you will find a leaders in the aerospace, renewable energy, and
healthcare industries. This is an area where entrepreneurs and private business owners thrive. We
are fertile ground rich in opportunity and culture that allows for a dedicated workforce to support
any business or venture capitalist looking for a home. Progress like this continues in our area
even in the midst of the recent water supply challenges being faced by all Californians.

Our region stretches north to the Fremont Valley aquifer that serves the Ridgecrest and China Lake
communities and west to the Cummings Valley basin where their outreach and education programs have
yielded a 20 gallon/day reduction in water consumption. Make no mistake water and the drought are
top of mind for every resident in our region.

Drought:California is in the midst of its worst drought since the early 20th century. The drought,
now entering its fourth year, with more sunny weather, above average temperatures, and reduced
precipitation, has impacted every corner of the State. The result? Decreased levels in the state’s
reservoirs, increased groundwater pumping, and a high fire risk. As for the water suppliers, there
is a renewed focus on managing water resources and availability.

Supply: The Sierra Nevada Mountain range supplies most of California with the life support of
water. We rely on the winter season to deliver snowpack and rain to fill our streams, rivers, and
lakes where it is stored for the future. Our State Water Project, or California Aqueduct system,
moves billions of gallons of water from north to south ensuring that the millions of residents, the
thousands of acres of agricultural fields, businesses and communities have enough water to thrive.
The system helps to ensure that an adequate supply is available for delivery throughout the year.

The Greater Antelope Valley has an advantage over other regions in the State; diversity. Although
we do rely on water imported from the State Water Project, several other local resources distinguish our water supply
story from others. With a more progressive focus on developing other local sources of water, we
have come to rely on much less of the imported allocation than most other regions in Southern
California. Imported water resources now supply about 50% of the demand during an average year with
the remaining amount supplied from groundwater and above ground storage. We are considered a
“closed basin,” which means that all water that starts here, or has been imported, stays here.

We are a desert community that has always done more with less. Irrigation from sag ponds left
behind by earthquakes once supplied water to the area. Over time, groundwater wells and the
Littlerock Dam were constructed to increase water availability for the growing area.

Today, the geography of the Greater Antelope Valley looks muchThis unique region of Southern California, with its micro-climates, deserts, mountains, valleys, and coastlines, make it a prime destination for living, working, and
raising a family. As to the residents of this unique area, we can boast in our creativity,
forward-thinking, and adaptability. These are the qualities that support California’s industry,
education, and communities.
The Greater Antelope Valley high desert region is located Northeast of Los Angeles, just over the
San Gabriel mountain range. Here you will find a leaders in the aerospace, renewable energy, and
healthcare industries. This is an area where entrepreneurs and private business owners thrive. We
are fertile ground rich in opportunity and culture that allows for a dedicated workforce to support
any business or venture capitalist looking for a home. Progress like this continues in our area
even in the midst of the recent water supply challenges being faced by all Californians.
Our region stretches north to the Fremont Valley aquifer that serves the Ridgecrest and China Lake
communities and west to the Cummings Valley basin where their outreach and education programs have
yielded a 20 gallon/day reduction in water consumption. Make no mistake water and the drought are
top of mind for every resident in our region.
Drought: California is in the midst of its worst drought since the early 20th century. The drought,
now entering its fourth year, with more sunny weather, above average temperatures, and reduced
precipitation, has impacted every corner of the State. The result? Decreased levels in the state’s
reservoirs, increased groundwater pumping, and a high fire risk. As for the water suppliers, there
is a renewed focus on managing water resources and availability.
Supply: The Sierra Nevada Mountain range supplies most of California with the life support of
water. We rely on the winter season to deliver snowpack and rain to fill our streams, rivers, and
lakes where it is stored for the future. Our State Water Project, or California Aqueduct system,
moves billions of gallons of water from north to south ensuring that the millions of residents, the
thousands of acres of agricultural fields, businesses and communities have enough water to thrive.
The system helps to ensure that an adequate supply is available for delivery throughout the year.
The Greater Antelope Valley has an advantage over other regions in the State; diversity. Although
we do rely on water imported from the State
Water Project, several other local resources distinguish our water supply
story from others. With a more progressive focus on developing other local sources of water, we
have come to rely on much less of the imported allocation than most other regions in Southern
California. Imported water resources now supply about 50% of the demand during an average year with
the remaining amount supplied from groundwater and above ground storage. We are considered a
“closed basin,” which means that all water that starts here, or has been imported, stays here.
We are a desert community that has always done more with less. Irrigation from sag ponds left
behind by earthquakes once supplied water to the area. Over time, groundwater wells and the
Littlerock Dam were constructed to increase water availability for the growing area.
Today, the geography of the Greater Antelope Valley looks much
different. Agriculture thrives alongside industry, small business, suburban
neighborhoods, and retail. The growing population has pushed community officials and governmental
districts to strategize on how to ensure that progress continues throughout the region. Water has
always been among the limiting factors for development, but with local efforts to stabilize our
water supply, it doesn’t have to be.
One example of our region’s effort to increase water supply diversity and reliability is through
water banking. Storing imported water here locally for future use will help to assure our
community’s ability to grow and prosper. Water suppliers like Los Angeles County, Palmdale Water
District, and Rosamond Community Services District are great examples of agencies taking part in
water banking in order to better serve their customers.
Recycling: Diversifying our water portfolio is a priority for the region. Decreasing our reliance
on water hundreds of miles away is a commitment we have embraced. The use of recycled water is a
dependable source of this
limited asset and is drought proof. We can store all of the water that we
create and put it back into the ground for future use.
Conservation: Conservation is a way of life here. The community understands that what they do
impacts their neighbors and that the Antelope Valley is a larger extension of their city. Water use
has dropped since former Governor Schwarzenegger declared a 20% reduction in usage by the year
2020. Residents have helped reduce peak demand in the summer months by converting yards to
desert-scapes and installing low water use appliances in their homes. Businesses have implemented
similar practices to assist in this local water conservation effort.
The people of our region take pride in our progressive thinking and responsible planning. The
Antelope Valley Integrated Regional Water Management Plan (AV IRWMP) navigates the complexity of
balancing resources through regional collaboration and provides a structure through which projects
are prioritized and selected for State funding opportunities.
Groundwater: In continuing to sustain a reliable, and diversified supply of water, our region’s
greatest asset is its large and productive groundwater basins. But now water is limited and we must
seek to replace water used with more water. Fortunately, the local groundwater adjudication process
is nearing its end with an anticipated settlement expected in 2015. The outcome will provide land
owners and businesses with a certainty in water supply from the region’s vast groundwater aquifer.
Most recently, an Integrated Regional Water Management Group formed between California City, Mojave
Public Utilities District, and the Antelope Valley East Kern Water Agency to develop planned
projects that will enhance the sustainability of the Fremont Valley Basin. This effort will be
lauded as another way to ensure the viability of our high desert water assets.
We pride ourselves on below average water consumption. We flourish because we do more with less. We
are well-positioned for responsible growth due to our successful resource management and
flexibility of our residents and workforce. Come be a part of Southern California’s leading edge.
We are open for business.
Special thanks to the regions’ water experts at Palmdale Water District, AVEK, LA County Sanitation
District and the AV-IRWMP planning group/stakeholders for their assistance in telling this story.
To learn more about the AV’s water assets and
plans go to AVWaterPlan.org

UTILITIES
Electricity Southern California Edison 1-800/655-4555 www.sce.com
Natural Gas SoCal Gas Sempra Energy 1-800/427-2200 socalgas.com
 TV / PHONE / INTERNET
AT&T 1-800/331-0500 att.com
Charter 1-888/438-2427 charter.com
Xfinity 1-855/399-1542 cabletv.com/comcast
DirecTV 1-800/531-5000 directv.com
GlobalNet 1-800/764-1304 surfglobal.net
MediaCom 1-855/633-4226 mediacomcable.com
Time Warner Cable 1-888/892-2253 timewarnercable.com
Verizon 1-800/483-5700 verizon.com
hdtv-16 phone-16 domain-16
AIR QUALITY
Antelope Valley Air Quality Management District 661/723-8070 www.avaqmd.ca.gov
Kern County Air Pollution Control District 661/862-5250 www.kernair.org
TRASH
Waste Management 661/947-7197
Benz Sanitation  661/822/5273 benzblue.com
Kern County Waste Management  661/862/8900 kerncountywaste.com/trash-collection
WATER
Antelope Valley East Kern Water Agency Water Quality Report: www.avek.org
Amount produced in 2012 79,000 acre feet (43,200 m&i; 5,300 ag; 31,400 Banking)
Amount produced in 2011 93,000 acre feet (50,000 m&i; 43,000 ag)
State Water Project entitlement 141,400 acre feet
Treatment Plant Capacity 118 million gallons per day (capable of serving nearly 500,000 people)
Palmdale Water District Water Quality Report: www.palmdalewater.org
Amount produced in 2015 14,781 acre feet billed / 16,590 acre feet produced
State Water Project Delivered 2015 4,260 acre feet
State Water Project Table A Amount 21,300 acre feet
Water Sources 2015 35% surface water / 65% groundwater Wells
Customers Served in 2015 26,508 connections serving approximately 116,258 people
Indian Wells Valley Water District Water Quality Report: www.iwvwd.com
Amount produced in 2015 7,050 acre feet
Amount produced in 2012 7,633 acre feet
Amount produced in 2011 7,364 acre feet
Amount produced in 2010 7,670 acre feet
Amount produced in 2009 8,084 acre feet
Amount produced in 2008 8,409 acre feet
Water Sources 10 ground water pumps
Customers Served in 2015 11,677 connections serving approximately 31,120 people